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Finland flexible work


My company,  Pagarba,  believes in the philosophy of remote work, respect and as much flexibility as possible. Just get work done when you need to. If you need to drop kids off at school, take college classes, go surfing , go the gym, whatever it's all about flexibility and creating an environment where you get your work and life in order.   I guess you could call it  the work life balance to the extreme philosophy.

" Employees will be able to decide when and where they work for at least half of their hours. As well as fitting their job around childcare commitments or exercise sessions, most full-time workers will be able to “bank” time off and use it to take extended holidays.

Daily treks into the city could become unnecessary as the new rules facilitate a choice of working remotely."

Finland is about to take flexible working a step further

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