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blockchain smart contracts lawyer and data feeds

Cool stuff going on in blockchain and side chains and smart contracts. 

" OpenLaw, the smart contract pioneer from New York, has partnered with Thomson Reuters to conduct a proof of concept (POC) that tests how Contract Express and the OpenLaw system can work together to log hashed data points from contracts on the Ethereum blockchain. That in turn has made it possible to begin with a Contract Express document and turn it into a smart contract with digital currency transaction and self-execution elements. 

The POC included executing smart contracts ‘on-chain’ from data inputted through Contract Express. "

https://www.artificiallawyer.com/2019/10/17/thomson-reuters-links-with-openlaw-for-smart-contract-express-project/

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