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This year, 22 cyberattacks have shut down city, county and state government computer systems


So almost 250 mayors from cities across the United States have signed a resolution agreement not to pay ransoms when it comes to cyber attacks, ransomware, and hacks. 

It's a stand against the multiple ransomware attacks that have crippled city and countht government computer systems in recent years. Baltimore and Atlanta come to mind. But 250 out of thousands of cities and mayor's mean there is a long way to go. 

What is a  ransomware attack ?

Ransomware attacks usually use some form of malware to lock out users. Lock out networks, databases, cloud access, mobile phones, applications, etc. And  unless the hackers get paid, they won't unlock the system.  Quite a few have demanded Bitcoin or other crypto tokens and even gave details on how to create or sign up for  a bitcoin wallet and buy and sell Bitcoin. 

So these random or Targeted Cities have been picked off one by one, with seemingly little recourse. Cities and governments have  been prime targets for ransomware attacks because many city IT departments lack infosec knowledge and experience and these  politicians can't afford to let certain services remain frozen for too long.  Atlanta couldn't pay people or operate common city services.

There have been over 25 attacks on cities in the USA this year.  And many times it is some organized crime syndicate or nationstate. That means many of the attackers aren't some 13 year old hacker learning computer science and information security stuff. 

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